Leipzig Urtext fonts now available from FontShop

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Two more Urtext Music Fonts have recently been released and are available now from FontShop. Back in July of this year we covered the release of an extensive set of eight fonts based upon the look of historical music engravings. Designer Stephen Carisse created these fonts, which span a range from the classic musical typography of Bach to grungy Civil War-era prints.

The latest — and according to Stephen — “possibly final” — releases from this historical project are two variations on late 18th and early 19th century Breitkopf (later Breitkopf & Härtel) editions: one based on movable type and one based on plate engraving.

The first of these, “Leipzig 1770”, Stephen said, is “based on the mosaic music font designed by Johann Gottlob Immanuel Breitkopf, a type which dominated music printing in the German Rococo and early Classical periods. Breitkopf also supplied fonts to many major German printers such as Johann Jakob Lotter of Augsburg (who printed Leopold Mozart’s violin method) and C.P.E. Bach, who self-published many of his works.”

Sample from the keyboard reduction of J.A. Hasse's 'Alcide al Bivio', Breitkopf, Leipzig, 1763 (click for full page)
Sample from the keyboard reduction of J.A. Hasse’s ‘Alcide al Bivio’, Breitkopf, Leipzig, 1763 (click for full page)
Page from the keyboard reduction of J.A. Hasse's 'Alcide al Bivio', set by me in Sibelius 7.1.3, using the Leipzig 1770 font (click for PDF)
Sample from the keyboard reduction of J.A. Hasse’s ‘Alcide al Bivio’, set by me in Sibelius 7.1.3, using the Leipzig 1770 font (click for PDF)

“Breikopf’s musical types became so widespread that many characteristic style elements found their way into music manuscripts of the period,” Stephen said.

The descendant of Leipzig 1770 is “Leipzig 1803”. As Stephen explained, “Gottfried Christoph Härtel acquired the Breitkopf firm in 1795. Breitkopf & Härtel abandoned Immanuel Breitkopf’s complex hand-set movable type. By the early 19th century they had turned to engraving their scores, but some features of the Breikopf house style can still be seen.”

FontShop offers these fonts for sale, as they have with the eight Urtext fonts previously available, at $39 each. Both Leipzig fonts are actually sets of six fonts that include text items, ornaments, and “extras”. The fonts include versions optimized for use Finale and Sibelius, and also feature a special Time Signatures Extras font, with some pre-fab items that can be used either directly (if the notation program allows for it) or as a models for constructing a similar look.

Using the fonts in Sibelius, Finale, or other notation software will likely require customizing certain settings. Read this earlier post for some tips on how to set up Sibelius for use with the Urtext fonts, and also see this post on the FontShop blog for more information.

Comments

  1. Dan Kreider

    Still waiting for SMuFL to broaden its reach!!

    1. Philip Rothman

      Yeah, this post just popped up on social media. It was from 2013, back when SMuFL was a wee tot.

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