If you’ve used music notation software — specifically Finale or Sibelius — for longer than about a decade, you’ll recall there was a time when the file and the score were essentially one and the same. If you wanted to make a set of parts from your score, you had to extract the parts into separate files.

When Sibelius 4 introduced Dynamic Parts feature in 2005, and Finale 2007 followed in due course with Linked Parts a year later, it revolutionized the workflow of creating a set of performance materials for a piece of music. Since then, I’ve hardly ever needed to extract parts from a Finale or Sibelius file — and you shouldn’t have to, either.

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Don’t extract parts

Ever since Sibelius 4 introduced Dynamic Parts feature in 2005, and Finale 2007 followed in due course with Linked Parts a year later, I’ve hardly ever needed to extract parts from a Finale or Sibelius file — and you shouldn’t have to, either.

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